2016-10-12 / Front Page

Eagle Scout project feeds hungry

BY STEVEN KOVAC
810-452-2684 • skovac@mihomepaper.com


Riley D. Good Riley D. Good Riley D. Good of Moore Township has joined some pretty elite company.

Sandusky Troop 333 of the Boy Scouts of America announced last week that Good, a Sandusky High School senior had achieved the rank of Eagle Scout, the highest level attainable in Scouting. According to Scouting statistics, only four percent of all Scouts reach that honor.

The 17-year-old will be inducted as an Eagle Scout during a Court of Honor ceremony Sunday, Nov. 6 in Sandusky.

Good started as a Cub Scout from first to fifth grade. He then entered the Boy Scouts, where he has been a member for 11 years.

Though advancement through the Scouting ranks can be rigorous, Good says he had fun doing it.

To become an Eagle Scout, a young man must pass muster in five prior levels of achievement beginning with “Tenderfoot.”

“I earned 32 merit badges,” says Good. “I needed 21 to become an Eagle Scout.”


Proud parents Steve and Jackie Good pose with son Riley, who will be inducted as an Eagle Scout in November. Riley is a senior at Sandusky High School and is headed for MSU next fall. 
Photo by Steven Kovac Proud parents Steve and Jackie Good pose with son Riley, who will be inducted as an Eagle Scout in November. Riley is a senior at Sandusky High School and is headed for MSU next fall. Photo by Steven Kovac Some of his most memorable merit badges came in the areas of wilderness survival, first aid, and farm mechanics.

Many of Scouting’s 130 merit badges are geared to introduce young men to possible future careers.

“Thirteen of the 130 were required badges. The additional eight that I earned were elective,” Good explained.

Some of the other requirements for a candidate seeking to become an Eagle Scout include obtaining six letters of recommendation and or character references, and the completion of an approved project - a process which ordinarily requires about 100 hours of labor.

“Eagle projects include anything that benefits your community, church, or other civic organization,” said Good.

“I chose to build a food pantry for my church, Countryside Free Methodist of Sandusky. I worked with a church committee called the Sportsmen’s Ministry to renovate an existing building and equip it as a food pantry for needy people in the community. It took us about two years.”

The project included removing and replacing the entry ramp to the building, removing and replacing windows, removing paneling and installing drywall, removing and replacing carpet, roof repair, and painting walls.

Good’s memories of Scouting include a five-day, 50-mile hike carrying a 40-pound pack, and a 100-mile canoe trip - both through Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

“Camping is my favorite thing,” said Good. His other interests are fishing, farming, and woodworking.

When asked if he had any advice for boys just starting out in Scouting, Good replied, “Stick with it.”

Good plans to attend Michigan State University next fall to study animal science, with a focus on large farm animals.

Riley resides with his parents, Steve and Jackie, on the family farm. He is the youngest of four children.

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